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Review: Jesus and the Victory of God by N.T. Wright

[Note: the following is from an old seminary paper of mine from 2011, which I just recently re-discovered buried in an old Google Drive folder. I present it here in its original form, though I can see now that it could have used a bit more editorial finesse!] N.T. Wright, Jesus and the Victory of […]

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Thoughts on the Evidential Argument from Desire

I’m in the middle of a unit on Christian Apologetics with my juniors. We are currently going through the existential argument, which claims that Christian faith is justified because it satisfies our deepest emotional and spiritual needs. I’ve written on this subject before, and I’d recommend that readers take a look at my previous post […]

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Review: The Grand Canyon: Monument to an Ancient Earth

I am now in my third year teaching theology at a Christian high school. In that time I’ve found that, among my students, few subjects provoke as many questions as the subject of creation/evolution: How old is the earth? Where did all the fossils come from? Did animals die before the Fall? Could God have […]

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Further Thoughts on Modern Bible Translations and Textual Criticism

Based on some helpful feedback that I received on my previous post on textual criticism, I thought that I should write a follow-up post to clarify a few things. To begin with, I should state upfront that I’m a relative newcomer to the subject of textual criticism, and would by no means consider myself an expert. […]

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Is Genesis a Myth? Part 2: Genesis and Science

Note: I originally wrote this post on another blog as part of an FAQ for my church in 2013. I am re-publishing here (with minor edits), since I will be using it in an upcoming class on science, faith, and Old Testament interpretation. Part 1 dealt with the literary relationship between Genesis and Ancient Near […]

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Is Genesis a Myth? Part 1: Genesis and Pagans

Note: I originally wrote this post on another blog as part of an FAQ for my church in 2013. I am re-publishing here (with minor edits), since I will be using it in an upcoming class on science, faith, and Old Testament interpretation. What’s the problem? Genesis 1-11 has sometimes been called “primeval history” because […]

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Jehovah’s Witnesses and Jesus As Theos in John’s Gospel

The doctrine of the deity of Christ has been affirmed by the vast majority of the Christian church throughout its history. Ever since the Council of Nicaea in AD 325, it has been considered a litmus test for orthodoxy. It is one of the few doctrines that unites the main branches of the faith—Protestantism, Roman […]

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In Defense of Worldview

The term “worldview” is thrown around a lot in evangelical circles—especially in the world of Christian education—but very rarely is it defined with any care or precision. Much less do many Christians realize just how controversial it is. After all, the term doesn’t come from Scripture or even from Christian theologians, but rather from modern […]

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Existential Apologetics: A Third Way beyond Classical and Presuppositional

This post is based on an adult Sunday school lesson that I taught at Riveroaks Reformed Presbyterian Church in Germantown, TN on June 14, 2015. It seems that most discussions on Christian apologetics these days have focused on two major schools of thought: classical and presuppositional. The classical folks trace their lineage back to Thomas […]

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C.S. Lewis Anticipated Thomas Nagel

I am currently walking my 9th grade theology class through C.S. Lewis’s classic Mere Christianity. We are on chapter 4, the final note of which called to mind the thesis of the recent book Mind and Cosmos by philosopher Thomas Nagel (Oxford University Press, 2012), which I reviewed last year. Nagel takes a rather unique position; although he […]

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