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In Defense of Worldview

The term “worldview” is thrown around a lot in evangelical circles—especially in the world of Christian education—but very rarely is it defined with any care or precision. Much less do many Christians realize just how controversial it is. After all, the term doesn’t come from Scripture or even from Christian theologians, but rather from modern […]

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Existential Apologetics: A Third Way beyond Classical and Presuppositional

This post is based on an adult Sunday school lesson that I taught at Riveroaks Reformed Presbyterian Church in Germantown, TN on June 14, 2015. It seems that most discussions on Christian apologetics these days have focused on two major schools of thought: classical and presuppositional. The classical folks trace their lineage back to Thomas […]

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C.S. Lewis Anticipated Thomas Nagel

I am currently walking my 9th grade theology class through C.S. Lewis’s classic Mere Christianity. We are on chapter 4, the final note of which called to mind the thesis of the recent book Mind and Cosmos by philosopher Thomas Nagel (Oxford University Press, 2012), which I reviewed last year. Nagel takes a rather unique position; although he […]

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The Proper Place of Science in Biblical Interpretation

Over on his blog Ponderings of a Pilgrim Pastor, Jason Van Bemmel has written this post on the slippery slope of selectively pitting secular science over against biblical teachings. He begins by saying that Christian educators make two fundamental mistakes in preparing our teens for college: We neglect their intellect, leaving them underequipped for the apologetic task. […]

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Apologetics and the Role of Plausibility Structures

In this post on The Gospel Coalition, Joe Carter hits the nail on the head. Why is it that some people can be persuaded by arguments for God’s existence, while others will look at you as if you’re trying to prove the existence of Santa Claus? According to Carter, it all has to do with a […]

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More Archaeological Support for the Bible?

For the better part of the past thirty years, being a conservative biblical archaeologist wasn’t very popular. The prevailing wisdom was that the further back in time the biblical narrative goes, the more fictional it becomes. Most scholars questioned whether there ever was a united Israelite monarchy, and whether David and Solomon were anything more than the ancient Jewish […]

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