Tag Archives: Abraham Kuyper

The American Solidarity Party: Would Kuyper Vote for Them? 

This election cycle has forced a lot of Christians—myself included—to rethink their approach to politics from the ground up. While Hillary Clinton’s nomination by the Democratic Party didn’t come as much of a shock, this time last year I couldn’t have predicted that Donald Trump would emerge victorious from the Republican primaries. And yet here […]

Continue reading

Kuyper on the Church and the Kingdom of God

Exactly what is the relation of the church to God’s kingdom? Are they the same thing? Are they distinct? Abraham Kuyper responds to these questions in the following quote, taken from his address to the Free Church in Amsterdam, now translated in the volume Rooted and Grounded: The Church as Organism and Institution (Christian’s Library Press, 2013): […]

Continue reading

In Defense of Worldview

The term “worldview” is thrown around a lot in evangelical circles—especially in the world of Christian education—but very rarely is it defined with any care or precision. Much less do many Christians realize just how controversial it is. After all, the term doesn’t come from Scripture or even from Christian theologians, but rather from modern […]

Continue reading

From Culture War Burnout to Cultural Faithfulness

The question of Christianity and cultural faithfulness has been one of my most passionate and personal questions; it’s also one of the more contentious questions facing the American Church today. The more you read, the more complicated the question becomes. As a friend of mine says often, “Everything is complicated and everything is connected.” How […]

Continue reading

A Neo-Calvinist Critique of Common Grace?

The following is an excerpt from the work Christ and Culture by Klaas Schilder (1890-1952), in which Schilder challenges the popular doctrine of “common grace” as developed by Abraham Kuyper. His logic is rather clever here, and it has consequences for our understanding of the Christian’s relationship to non-Christian culture. Is God’s restraint of his judgment against sinners […]

Continue reading

Resources on Neo-Calvinism and Two Kingdoms

Books Bavinck, Herman. Reformed Dogmatics. 4 vols. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 2008. Bratt, James. Abraham Kuyper: Modern Calvinist, Christian Democrat. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2013. Frame, John. The Escondido Theology: A Reformed Response to Two Kingdom Theology. Whitefield Media, 2011. Kuyper, Abraham. Lectures on Calvinism. Grand Rapids, M: Eerdmans, 1943. McIlhenny, Ryan, ed. Kingdoms Apart: […]

Continue reading

A Quick and Easy Chart on Two Kingdoms and Neo-Calvinism

The doctrine of “two kingdoms” has received a lot of attention in Reformed circles lately. Some say the idea is clearly Calvinistic, while others reject it as a “Lutheran” distinctive. To clear up some of the confusion over these issues, I recently created this chart and posted it publicly. It has generated a lot of […]

Continue reading

Interacting with Christmas Culture

Christmas is a beautiful time of year to engage well with the broader culture. Unfortunately many of us fail at this because we don’t want to engage lovingly, winsomely, or sacrificially with those around us. I will give you an example. A wonderful saint sent me the video below. If you have an extra three […]

Continue reading

Lord over Every Square Inch of CSU

Things took a turn for the worse for evangelical campus ministries nationwide last week. America’s largest university system, California State University, has officially “derecognized” InterVarsity Christian Fellowship on all of its 23 campuses. This was in response to IVCF’s refusal to comply with CSU’s new “all-comers” policy requiring all campus organizations to open up leadership roles […]

Continue reading

Two Kingdoms vs. Two Cities: What’s the Difference?

As Christians, we are called to be “in” the world but not “of” the world. Jesus preached in the Sermon on the Mount that our mission is to be salt and light (Matt. 5:13-16). But exactly how are we supposed to do this in the midst of a secular culture? What does it look like concretely? […]

Continue reading