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Alexandrians vs. Antiochenes on Mosaic Law (Part 2)

Note: this is the second part of a paper originally written for a class on the History of Biblical Interpretation at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. Part 1 can be read here. Evaluation of Origen The advantage of Origen’s approach is that it compels Christians to read their Old Testament and wrestle thoroughly with its text. A […]

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Alexandrians vs. Antiochenes on Mosaic Law (Part 1)

Note: this paper was previously written for a class on the History of Biblical Interpretation at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. Due to the paper’s original length, I will split it into two parts (Part 2 can be read here). Introduction Ever since its inception, the church has struggled to understand the proper place of […]

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Roundup on the Frame-Dolezal Dustup

First it was Eternal Subordination of the Son; now it’s Theistic Mutualism. It’s hard to keep up with all of these modern evangelical debates over the doctrine of God. For those just tuning in, the latest controversy centers on the recently published volume All That Is in God by Reformed Baptist theologian James Dolezal (Reformation […]

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A Quick and Easy Guide to the Apostolic Fathers

To commemorate the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, I have started teaching an adult Sunday School series on Church History. There’s a wealth of wisdom to be learned from the early church, but it can be pretty daunting to the uninitiated! I’ve tried to make things a little more accessible to my congregation by […]

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Robert Rollock on the Merit of Christ

Robert Rollock was a 16th-century Scottish Reformed theologian, credited with developing the idea of a distinction between a covenant of works and a covenant of grace between God and man (aka “bicovenantalism”), and with helping bring Reformed theology to the British Isles. Although his work was influential for later mainstream Reformed theology, he was also […]

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Kuyper on the Church and the Kingdom of God

Exactly what is the relation of the church to God’s kingdom? Are they the same thing? Are they distinct? Abraham Kuyper responds to these questions in the following quote, taken from his address to the Free Church in Amsterdam, now translated in the volume Rooted and Grounded: The Church as Organism and Institution (Christian’s Library Press, 2013): […]

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Setting the Record Straight on Lutheranism: Four Myths

Calvinists and Lutherans have a complicated history. Both traditions are rooted in the Protestant Reformation understandings of justification (sola fide) and authority (sola scriptura). Calvin himself acknowledged his debt to Luther and was even accused of being a Lutheran. In their early years, the two movements were able to find much common ground, and at […]

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Why I Might Become a Historic Premillennialist

I should probably start by giving a brief theological autobiography. From a very young age, I had bought into dispensational premillennialism. I read nearly all the Left Behind books as a teenager, becoming convinced that a pre-tribulational rapture was the biblical view. All that changed when I went to college, where I majored in history […]

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A Neo-Calvinist Critique of Common Grace?

The following is an excerpt from the work Christ and Culture by Klaas Schilder (1890-1952), in which Schilder challenges the popular doctrine of “common grace” as developed by Abraham Kuyper. His logic is rather clever here, and it has consequences for our understanding of the Christian’s relationship to non-Christian culture. Is God’s restraint of his judgment against sinners […]

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A Quick and Easy Chart on Two Kingdoms and Neo-Calvinism

The doctrine of “two kingdoms” has received a lot of attention in Reformed circles lately. Some say the idea is clearly Calvinistic, while others reject it as a “Lutheran” distinctive. To clear up some of the confusion over these issues, I recently created this chart and posted it publicly. It has generated a lot of […]

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