Review: Jesus and the Victory of God by N.T. Wright

[Note: the following is from an old seminary paper of mine from 2011, which I just recently re-discovered buried in an old Google Drive folder. I present it here in its original form, though I can see now that it could have used a bit more editorial finesse!] N.T. Wright, Jesus and the Victory of […]

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Review: The Pericope of the Adulteress in Contemporary Research

David Alan Black and Jacob N. Cerone, Editors. The Pericope of the Adulteress in Contemporary Research. T&T Clark, 2016. 216 pages. They went each to his own house, but Jesus went to the Mount of Olives. Early in the morning he came again to the temple. All the people came to him, and he sat down […]

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Alexandrians vs. Antiochenes on Mosaic Law (Part 2)

Note: this is the second part of a paper originally written for a class on the History of Biblical Interpretation at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. Part 1 can be read here. Evaluation of Origen The advantage of Origen’s approach is that it compels Christians to read their Old Testament and wrestle thoroughly with its text. A […]

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Alexandrians vs. Antiochenes on Mosaic Law (Part 1)

Note: this paper was previously written for a class on the History of Biblical Interpretation at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. Due to the paper’s original length, I will split it into two parts (Part 2 can be read here). Introduction Ever since its inception, the church has struggled to understand the proper place of […]

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Thoughts on the Evidential Argument from Desire

I’m in the middle of a unit on Christian Apologetics with my juniors. We are currently going through the existential argument, which claims that Christian faith is justified because it satisfies our deepest emotional and spiritual needs. I’ve written on this subject before, and I’d recommend that readers take a look at my previous post […]

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Roundup on the Frame-Dolezal Dustup

First it was Eternal Subordination of the Son; now it’s Theistic Mutualism. It’s hard to keep up with all of these modern evangelical debates over the doctrine of God. For those just tuning in, the latest controversy centers on the recently published volume All That Is in God by Reformed Baptist theologian James Dolezal (Reformation […]

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A Quick and Easy Guide to the Apostolic Fathers

To commemorate the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, I have started teaching an adult Sunday School series on Church History. There’s a wealth of wisdom to be learned from the early church, but it can be pretty daunting to the uninitiated! I’ve tried to make things a little more accessible to my congregation by […]

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Resources on Daniel’s Seventy Weeks

24 Seventy weeks are decreed about your people and your holy city, to finish the transgression, to put an end to sin, and to atone for iniquity, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal both vision and prophet, and to anoint a most holy place [literally holy of holies]. 25 Know therefore and understand that […]

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Review: The Grand Canyon: Monument to an Ancient Earth

I am now in my third year teaching theology at a Christian high school. In that time I’ve found that, among my students, few subjects provoke as many questions as the subject of creation/evolution: How old is the earth? Where did all the fossils come from? Did animals die before the Fall? Could God have […]

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For a Continuing Church: A Review, Part Two

Note: Part One of this review offers an evaluation of For a Continuing Church and its main thesis concerning the PCA’s identity. Applying Our Identity As Dr. Sean Lucas convincingly establishes throughout For a Continuing Church, the PCA was formed as a “conservative ‘mainline’ Presbyterian body.” The founders chose to establish broader boundaries for the […]

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For a Continuing Church: A Review, Part One

Introduction: Identity and Reformation “Nearly all the wisdom we possess, that is to say, true and sound wisdom, consists of two parts: the knowledge of God and of ourselves.”[1] Wisdom, according to John Calvin, requires an accurate self-assessment. That Calvin sets this assertion at the very head of his magisterial Institutes shows that the calling […]

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Further Thoughts on Modern Bible Translations and Textual Criticism

Based on some helpful feedback that I received on my previous post on textual criticism, I thought that I should write a follow-up post to clarify a few things. To begin with, I should state upfront that I’m a relative newcomer to the subject of textual criticism, and would by no means consider myself an expert. […]

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In Defense of Modern Bible Translations: A Case for Eclecticism in Textual Criticism

How do we know that the text of the Bible has been reliably preserved throughout the centuries? If I were to make a list of all the objections that I commonly hear from skeptics against Scripture’s authority, this question would probably come close to the top of that list. It is often argued that if […]

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Is Genesis a Myth? Part 2: Genesis and Science

Note: I originally wrote this post on another blog as part of an FAQ for my church in 2013. I am re-publishing here (with minor edits), since I will be using it in an upcoming class on science, faith, and Old Testament interpretation. Part 1 dealt with the literary relationship between Genesis and Ancient Near […]

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