Archive | July, 2014

I Cry, But Thou Hearest Not, by Abraham Kuyper

9. I Cry, But Thou Hearest Not To get no answer! when we stand at a closed door and it is not opened, makes us feel anxious. We then knock harder and harder, and when this brings no response, we call louder and louder; and when still no sound is heard, and there comes no […]

Continue reading

Athanasius and the Scope of the Story

Over at Spiritual Friendship, my friend Kyle Keating has written this post on the theology of St. Athanasius, 4th-century bishop of Alexandria and chief opponent of the heretic Arius. The gist: our framework for morality must be grounded in the overall storyline of Scripture. If we hold to any ethic—and in this case any ethic departing […]

Continue reading

“Was Bonhoeffer Gay?” And Other Adventures in Missing the Point

Trevin Wax has posted this review on The Gospel Coalition on the subject of a new biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer called Strange Glory by Deckle Edge (Knopf, 2014). In this biography, Edge suggests that Bonhoeffer may have been gay (even though he died a virgin), and experienced sexual attraction toward his close friend Eberhard Bethge. The gist of Wax’s […]

Continue reading

The Looming Genocide of Iraqi Christians?

As has been reported by Christianity Today, the terrorist group ISIS (Islamic State in Iraq and Syria) has issued an ultimatum to the Christian residents of the Northern Iraqi city of Mosul: convert to Islam, pay the jizya (tax on non-Muslims), or face the sword. The tax is too much for many of these believers to afford, […]

Continue reading

An Untempered Schism

Regardless of how one pronounces it, a schism is a serious thing.  The division of the Church into East and West, and the rift opened up between Wittenberg and Rome are some of the saddest realities in the Body of Christ.  The ever stimulating Peter Leithart has a new blog post wherein he reviews Deep […]

Continue reading

Sanctification and the Heidelberg Catechism, Part Two

Jon Payne has now written his second post on sanctification and the Heidelberg Catechism (HC) at Reformation 21. In his first post (to which I responded here), he discussed the variety of motivations for Christian obedience, which extend beyond mere gratitude for our justification (as important as that is). Now, he takes up the subjects of […]

Continue reading

Michael Bird’s Advice to Younger Scholars

On his blog Euangelion, as well as on Zondervan’s blog Koinonia, there’s a short Youtube video of Dr. Michael Bird offering advice to young theologians. He gives three basic tips: 1) don’t be a man-pleaser, 2) work in the primary languages and sources, and 3) take measures to keep your work spiritually fresh. The video is available […]

Continue reading

Radical(ly Normal)

Shane Lems has written this book review on The Reformed Reader (HT: The Aquila Report). The book happens to be authored by a close friend of mine, Josh Kelley, who pastored the church I attended while living in Mt. Vernon, Washington (my hometown). As a matter of fact, I had the privilege of helping Josh with the editorial process for this book. […]

Continue reading

Was Jonathan Edwards a Puritan?

Dr. Mark Jones has written this post at Reformation 21 about the proper historical limits of “Puritanism.” He argues that Jonathan Edwards lived far too late for the term to be applied to him in any historically meaningful way. It is debatable when exactly the Puritan movement came to an end, but its terminus ad […]

Continue reading

What Is the Doctrine of “Republication?”

Over at Old Life, D.G. Hart has written this piece on the recently published book Merit and Moses by Andrew Elam, Robert Van Kooten, and Randall Bergquist (Wipf & Stock, 2014). As the subtitle indicates, the book is a critique of a relatively obscure and ambiguous doctrine known as “republication.” This doctrine has been around in some form or […]

Continue reading