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What Does Republication Have to Do with Christotelic Hermeneutics? Quite a Lot, Actually

Those who have followed the Reformed blogosphere lately will likely have heard a lot of talk about two intramural controversies over Old Testament interpretation. What they may not realize, however, is just how much these two controversies actually have in common. The first controversy has been around for quite a while, although it has attracted […]

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Patrick Fairbairn on the Law’s Promise of Life

Patrick Fairbairn was a 19th-century minister in the Free Church of Scotland and Professor of Church History and Exegesis at Free Church College in Glasgow (now Trinity College). His most notable works included The Typology of Scripture, The Interpretation of Prophecy, and The Revelation of Law in Scripture. The following is an excerpt from his work An Exposition […]

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The Proper Place of Science in Biblical Interpretation

Over on his blog Ponderings of a Pilgrim Pastor, Jason Van Bemmel has written this post on the slippery slope of selectively pitting secular science over against biblical teachings. He begins by saying that Christian educators make two fundamental mistakes in preparing our teens for college: We neglect their intellect, leaving them underequipped for the apologetic task. […]

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Merit and Moses (Part 1)

David Murray, professor of Old Testament at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary, has reviewed the recent book Merit and Moses: A Critique of the Klinean Doctrine of Republication by OPC pastors Andrew Elam, Robert Van Kooten, and Randall Berquist. The book is a direct response to The Law Is Not of Faith: Essays on Works and Grace in the Mosaic […]

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Review: Four Views on the Role of Works at the Final Judgment

Alan Stanley, editor. Four Views on the Role of Works at the Final Judgment. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2013. Scripture consistently holds two seemingly contradictory truths in tension: we are justified by grace through faith, and we will be judged according to our works. How are we to resolve this tension while respecting the authority […]

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Paul and the Faithfulness of God: A Review

At Reformation 21, New Testament scholar Simon Gathercole has written a review of N.T. Wright’s massive new volume, Paul and the Faithfulness of God (Fortress, 2013). Considering that the book itself is about 1,600 pages, Gathercole has done a remarkable job of distilling Wright’s main ideas in relatively little space. Gathercole says that the main thesis of PFG is: […]

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Dr. Doug Green Affirmed by New Life Presbyterian Church Session

On his blog The Ecclesial Calvinist, Dr. Bill Evans of Erskine College has just posted a statement issued by the session of New Life Presbyterian Church (PCA) in Glenside, Pennsylvania, unanimously affirming the confessional orthodoxy of one of its Ruling Elders, Dr. Doug Green (the statement is also available on New Life’s website). Dr. Green—under whom I briefly had […]

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Athanasius and the Scope of the Story

Over at Spiritual Friendship, my friend Kyle Keating has written this post on the theology of St. Athanasius, 4th-century bishop of Alexandria and chief opponent of the heretic Arius. The gist: our framework for morality must be grounded in the overall storyline of Scripture. If we hold to any ethic—and in this case any ethic departing […]

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Radical(ly Normal)

Shane Lems has written this book review on The Reformed Reader (HT: The Aquila Report). The book happens to be authored by a close friend of mine, Josh Kelley, who pastored the church I attended while living in Mt. Vernon, Washington (my hometown). As a matter of fact, I had the privilege of helping Josh with the editorial process for this book. […]

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What Is the Doctrine of “Republication?”

Over at Old Life, D.G. Hart has written this piece on the recently published book Merit and Moses by Andrew Elam, Robert Van Kooten, and Randall Bergquist (Wipf & Stock, 2014). As the subtitle indicates, the book is a critique of a relatively obscure and ambiguous doctrine known as “republication.” This doctrine has been around in some form or […]

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